Videos

Rainfall Accumulation Across the United States (1/1/2015 - 7/16/2015)

This visualization shows heavy rainfall throughout Northern Texas and across Oklahoma from January 1, 2015 through July 16, 2015 as well as the drought in Southern California during that same time period.

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission launched on Feb. 27, 2014. It is a collaboration between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and acts as the standard to unify precipitation measurements from a network of 12 satellites. The result is IMERG, which combines data from all 12 satellites into a single, seamless map. The map covers more of the globe than any...

GPM Dissects Typhoon Hagupit

On December 5, 2014 (1032 UTC) the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory flew over Typhoon Hagupit as it headed towards the Philippines. A few hours later at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST), Super Typhoon Hagupit's maximum sustained winds were near 130 knots (149.6 mph/241 kph), down from 150 knots (172 mph/277.8 kph). Typhoon-force winds extend out 40 nautical miles (46 miles/74 km) from the center, while tropical-storm-force winds extend out to 120 miles (138 miles/222 km).

The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments that show the location and intensity of rain and...

GPM Sees Hurricane Matthew's Life Cycle

Hurricane Matthew dropped a lot of rain, caused flooding and deaths in the state of North Carolina. Flooding is still widespread in North Carolina. Some rivers in North Carolina such as the Tar and the Neuse Rivers were still rising on Oct. 12, 2016.

At NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, a rainfall analysis was accomplished using data from NASA's Integrated Multi-satellite Retrievals for GPM (IMERG). The GPM, or Global Precipitation Measurement, mission is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

This rainfall analysis was...

NASA Satellite Captures 3-D View of Hurricane Matthew

NASA’s Precipitation Measurement Missions' GPM core satellite captured Hurricane Matthew in 3-D as it made landfall on Haiti and as it traveled up to the Florida coast.

The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission or GPM flew directly over the storm several times between October 2 - October 6, 2016. The view on October 6 reveals massive amounts of rainfall being produced by the storm as it approaches Florida.

The GPM core satellite carries two instruments that show the location and intensity of rain and snow, which defines a crucial part of the storm structure – and how it will behave. The...

GPM Captures Hurricane Matthew Before Haiti Landfall

This animation starts with an overview of North America, Central America, and the Caribbean. As the camera slowly pushes in, Hurricane Matthew begins to form. By the morning of Oct. 2, 2016, Matthew is a category 4 hurricane immediately south of Haiti and the Dominican Republic. Time then slows down to see GPM's GPROF swath reveal ground precipitation from the hurricane. Now, with the camera closer in the view rotates to reveal a curtain of three-dimensional radar data from GPM's DPR instrument. DPR shows us the 3-D structure of the hurricane's precipitation rates. Areas in blue and purple are...

GPM Provides a Closer Look at the Louisiana Floods

Twice on Aug. 12, 2016, GPM flew over a massive rainstorm that flooded large portions of Louisiana. The flooding was some of the worst ever in the state, resulting in a state of emergency. Tens of thousands of people were evacuated from their homes in the wake of this unprecedented event.

Throughout the course of Aug. 12 (UTC) GPM captured the internal structure of the storm twice and GPM IMERG measured the rainfall accumulation on the ground.

NASA's GPM satellite is designed to measure rainfall using both passive microwave (GMI) and radar (DPR) instruments. DPR can observe 3-D structures of...

Hurricane Forecasts Rely on Modeling the Past

Improving hurricane forecasts means testing historical storms with today's sophisticated models and supercomputers. NASA and NOAA work together in gathering ground and satellite observations, as well as experimenting with research forecast models. As a result of this collaboration, model resolution has increased, and scientists are discovering more about the processes that occur within these powerful storms.

The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is a joint NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) mission that measures all forms of precipitation around the globe. GPMs...

NASA’s Global Tour of Precipitation in Ultra HD (4K)

Precipitation (falling rain and snow) is our fresh water reservoir in the sky and is fundamental to life on Earth. This video shows the most detailed and worldwide view of rain and snowfall ever created and uses satellite measurements from the Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory, or GPM, a joint mission between NASA and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).

Tracking precipitation from space with satellites provides information of where, when, and how much it rains and snows anywhere in the world and gives insight into the behavior of our weather, climate, and...

Monsoons: Wet, Dry, Repeat...

 

The monsoon is a seasonal rain and wind pattern that occurs over South Asia (among other places). Through NASA satellites and models we can see the monsoon patterns like never before. Monsoon rains provide important reservoirs of water that sustain human activities like agriculture and supports the natural environment through replenishment of aquifers. However, too much rainfall routinely causes disasters in the region, including flooding of the major rivers and landslides in areas of steep topography. This visualization uses a combination of NASA satellite data and models to show how and...

Life of the Monsoon

The monsoon is a seasonal rain and wind pattern that occurs over South Asia (among other places). Through NASA satellites and models we can see the monsoon patterns like never before. Monsoon rains provide important reservoirs of water that sustain human activities like agriculture and supports the natural environment through replenishment of aquifers. However, too much rainfall routinely causes disasters in the region, including flooding of the major rivers and landslides in areas of steep topography. This is a web video version of the full visualization (featured below).

Music: Ruminations...