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Browse glaciers Resources

Browse glaciers Resources

Getting the Picture: Our Changing Climate
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This free online interactive resource is a multimedia tool for teaching middle and high school students about climate change. It uses an interdisciplinary approach that infuses geography, science, and art...
Photo of Earth's oceans from space
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This activity was developed to give participants an understanding of how much and where water is on Earth by participating in a demonstration and using maps.
Graph showing the distribution of Earth's freshwater resources
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This classroom activity (originally developed for the GPM Poster) will teach students about the value of Earth's freshwater resources and how important it is to study how water is transferred and stored.
Multiple Earth's showing different heat visualizations
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Explore the solar heating of the ocean in part one of a series on the water cycle. The animations show multiple views of the solar heating of the oceans, a picture of this first stage of water's cyclical journey from sea to air to land, and back again.
Chart showing sea ice decline
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The cryosphere consists of those parts of the Earth's surface where water is found in solid form, including areas of snow, sea ice, glaciers, permafrost, ice sheets, and icebergs. This animation shows fluctuations in the cryosphere.
Thumbnail for Melting Ice, Rising Seas, showing ice and title text
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Using satellites, lasers, and radar in space, and dedicated researchers on the ground, NASA is studying the Earth's ice and water to better understand how sea level rise might affect us all.