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Browse Water Cycle Resources

Browse Water Cycle Resources

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The purpose of this lesson is to provide students with experience creating models of landforms and bodies of water. Students review the characteristics of landforms and bodies of water in an active game, and then make models of these.
The Water Cycle - Animation
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This animation shows the entire process of the water cycle throughout the course of a day.
Identifying Landforms and Bodies of Water on a Map
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The purpose of this lesson is to expose elementary level students to the practice of “developing and using models” as students explore and identify landforms and bodies of water on a map of the world. It is anticipated that this lesson will take one hour.
Earth Wheel Lesson Plan
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This is the first of three lessons that have been developed to teach students about Earth’s water cycle, the importance of freshwater resources, and how NASA studies water in Earth’s systems.
Water's Family Tree: Where Did it Come From?
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Read about the chemistry of water and how scientists believe it formed and came to be found on Earth.
Magnifying glass over a globe.
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Read about why we need to measure precipitation from space, instead of relying solely on ground-based measurements.
Exploring the Water Cycle
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In this lesson, students will learn about the water cycle and how energy from the sun and the force of gravity drive this cycle.
The Anatomy of a Raindrop
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Contrary to popular belief, raindrops are not tear shaped and are actually shaped like the top of a hamburger bun, round on the top and flat on the bottom. This new video from GPM explains why.
Rain Gauge Activity
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In this hands-on inquiry-based activity, students face an engineering challenge based on real-world applications. They are tasked with developing a tool they can use to measure the amount of rain that falls each day.
Water Cycle Speaker's Toolkit
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This Speaker ToolKit has been designed to allow presenters (scientists, engineers, etc.) to easily present to an elementary and/or middle school audience about the water cycle.

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