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Browse Water Properties Resources

Browse Water Properties Resources

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Requires access to a 3D printer. Learn how to use our 3D printed GPM data to teach about the structure of storms.
GPM Project Scientist Gail Skofronick-Jackson explains why all snowflakes have six sides and how the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission can measure falling snow from space.
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GPM Project Scientist Gail Skofronick-Jackson explains why all snowflakes have six sides and how the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission can measure falling snow from space.
Size Matters: NASA Measures Raindrop Sizes From Space to Understand Storms
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This video explains why the size and shape of raindrops in a cloud matters to scientists, and how the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission is able to provide these measurements from space.
Ground Validation and OLYMPEX Webquest – Elementary Version
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You will learn how we measure rain and snow from the ground and from space using satellites, and why we need to check the data using ground validation. This particularly relates to the OLYMPEX Field Campaign.
This IQuest has been created to take you on a journey that allows you to discover how water, the single most important ingredient for life as we know it, moves through Earth’s systems. We will also learn how NASA is able to follow the water as it moves in and out of its three phases during its travels, and why this is vital to our existence.
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This IQuest has been created to take you on a journey that allows you to discover how water, the single most important ingredient for life as we know it, moves through Earth’s systems.
Water's Family Tree: Where Did it Come From?
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Read about the chemistry of water and how scientists believe it formed and came to be found on Earth.
The Anatomy of a Raindrop
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Contrary to popular belief, raindrops are not tear shaped and are actually shaped like the top of a hamburger bun, round on the top and flat on the bottom. This new video from GPM explains why.
Rain Gauge Activity
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In this hands-on inquiry-based activity, students face an engineering challenge based on real-world applications. They are tasked with developing a tool they can use to measure the amount of rain that falls each day.
Sea Surface Temperature, Salinity and Density
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The animations in this group show the long-term average sea surface temperature, the long term average sea surface salinity, and the the long term average sea surface density.
The Thermohaline Circulation - The Great Ocean Conveyor Belt
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The oceans are mostly composed of warm salty water near the surface over cold, less salty water in the ocean depths. These two regions don't mix except in certain special areas, which creates a large slow current called the thermohaline circulation.

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