GPM

Second Flight Attitude Control Test Completed

A second scheduled test of the guidance and control system on the H-IIA launch vehicle has been completed to confirm that all devices for flight attitude control are working as expected.

NASA Television has begun coverage of the GPM Core Observatory launch originating from Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Watch online at: http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

GPM Ready for Launch

GPM Ready for Launch
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GPM Ready for Launch

A Japanese H-IIA rocket with the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory onboard, is seen on launch pad 1 of the Tanegashima Space Center, Friday, Feb. 28, 2014, Tanegashima, Japan. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Launch Preparations Proceed After Second Go/No Decision

The launch of the GPM Core Observatory is proceeding toward launch at Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. Final checks have been made for the operational conditions of the H-IIA launch vehicle, satellites, launch facilities, tracking and control systems, and weather conditions.

The process of loading propellant, such as liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen, into the rocket has begun.

Terminal countdown operations also begun. Access to the launch pad is now restricted within a radius of 400 meters.

GPM's Launch Pad

GPM's Launch Pad
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GPM's Launch Pad

Launch pad 1 is seen at the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 in Tanegashima, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from pad 1 on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

GPM Science Briefing

GPM Science Briefing
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GPM Science Briefing

From left: Riko Oki, GPM Project Scientist, JAXA, Yukari Takayabu, Professor, Atmosphere and Ocean Research Institute, Gail Skofronick-Jackson, NASA GPM Project Scientist, and, Ramesh Kakar, GPM Program Earth Scientist , NASA Headquarters, are seen during a science briefing for the launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory aboard an H-IIA rocket, Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. Launch is scheduled for early in the morning of Feb. 28 Japan time.

Faces of GPM: Dr. Dalia Kirschbaum, GPM Applications Scientist

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Dr. Kirschbaum discusses her role with GPM, how she became a scientist, and how remotely sensed satellite data can be used to study and evaluate natural hazards such as landslides.

This video is the first in a series called "Faces of GPM", which will interview several GPM team members to learn what it is like to be a NASA scientist or engineer.
 
 

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