testing and integration

Engineers working on the GPM Core Observatory
By Ellen Gray, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Original www.nasa.gov Article (published 10/17/12) NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite went through its first complete comprehensive performance test (CPT), beginning on Oct. 4, 2012 at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. The testing ran twenty-four hours, seven days a week and lasted ten days as the entire spacecraft was put through its paces. "This is the first time we've gotten to see the observatory all put together, running the way it's supposed to be running in flight," said CPT Test...

GPM Completes First Dry Run

Engineers working on the GPM Core Observatory
Image Caption
Engineers check on the GPM spacecraft after successful completion of its first comprehensive performance test.

The silver disc and drum (center) is the GPM Microwave Imager, and the large block on the base is the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar. The tall golden antenna is the High Gain Antenna for communications.

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Successful Electrical Integration of GPM’s Two Instruments

The electrical integration of the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument onto the GPM Core Observatory was successfully completed in April 2012. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. Boulder, Colo. built the GMI, which arrived at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. in early March and after post shipment processing it was handed over to NASA. The GMI is one of the key instruments for the GPM Core Observatory. This instrument is a passive radiometer with 13 channels covering frequencies from 10 to 183 GHz. In May, 2012, the Dual-frequency
DPR arriving on a truck at NASA Goddard
By Aries Keck, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Original www.nasa.gov Press Release (published 3/1/12) The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) built by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory arrived on Friday, March 16 and was unloaded today at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. Comprised of two radars, the DPR is one of two instruments that will fly on the Core Observatory scheduled for launch in February 2014. Engineers from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and NASA Goddard...