Videos

Atmospheric River Slams California

After more than four years of drought, Californians may wonder where the current rain is coming from. Using satellites, NASA scientists have a unique view of the sources of precipitation, and how it reaches the western United States.

Rain is often carried by narrow tendrils of moisture called atmospheric rivers that occur all over the world, shown here in white. The atmospheric rivers that affect the western United States are known as the Pineapple Express because they transport water vapor from as far south as Hawaii to California. When the moisture reaches land, it is forced up over the...

GPM Examines Super Typhoon Maysak

Visualization depicting Typhoon Maysak in the Southwest Pacific region as observed by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Satellite on March 30, 2015.  GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) precipitation rates are displayed first, then a slicing place moves across the volume to display precipitation rates throughout the structure of the storm.  Shades of green to red represent liquid precipitation extending down to the ground.

The storm later intensified to a category 5-equivalent super typhoon with 150-mph sustained winds.

The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments that show the...

Rainfall Accumulation Across the United States (1/1/2015 - 7/16/2015)

This visualization shows heavy rainfall throughout Northern Texas and across Oklahoma from January 1, 2015 through July 16, 2015 as well as the drought in Southern California during that same time period.

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission launched on Feb. 27, 2014. It is a collaboration between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and acts as the standard to unify precipitation measurements from a network of 12 satellites. The result is IMERG, which combines data from all 12 satellites into a single, seamless map. The map covers more of the globe than any...

GPM Dissects Typhoon Hagupit

On December 5, 2014 (1032 UTC) the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory flew over Typhoon Hagupit as it headed towards the Philippines. A few hours later at 1500 UTC (10 a.m. EST), Super Typhoon Hagupit's maximum sustained winds were near 130 knots (149.6 mph/241 kph), down from 150 knots (172 mph/277.8 kph). Typhoon-force winds extend out 40 nautical miles (46 miles/74 km) from the center, while tropical-storm-force winds extend out to 120 miles (138 miles/222 km).

The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments that show the location and intensity of rain and...

Accumulated Precipitation from the IMERG Global Precipitation Data

The global IMERG precipitation dataset provides rainfall rates for the entire world every thirty minutes.  Using this dataset, it is possible to calculate the amount of accumulated rainfall for any region over a period of time.  This visualization shows the accumulation of rainfall across the globe August 4, 2014 through August 10, 2014.  In addition to the dramatic accumulation near Japan due to Typhoon Halong and the track of Hurricane Bertha off the eastern coast of the United States, it is also possible to see a rare August storm over the North Sea near Europe, the origins of Hurricane...

GPM Explores Typhoon Vongfong

On October 9, 2014 (0248 UTC) the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core Observatory flew over Typhoon Vongfong as it headed towards Japan. At this point, the storm had weakened to a category 4 typhoon with maximum sustained winds at 150 miles per hour (mph), down form a category 5 typhoon on October 8th. This visualization first reveals a swath of GPM/GMI precipitation rates over Typhoon Vongfong.  As the camera moves in on the storm, DPR's volumetric view of the storm is revealed.  A slicing plane moves across the volume to display precipitation rates throughout the storm...

IMERG Accumulated Precipitation of Three Hurricanes Threatening Hawaii

Visualization showing accumulated precipitation from three hurricanes (Genevieve, Iselle, and Julio) around the Hawaiian Islands, with Hurricane Iselle making landfall.

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission has produced its first global map of rainfall and snowfall. The GPM Core Observatory launched on Feb. 27, 2014 as a collaboration between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and acts as the standard to unify precipitation measurements from a network of 12 satellites. The result is NASA's Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM data product, called IMERG, which...

GPM Observes Snow Storm over Kentucky, West Virginia, and North Carolina (February 17, 2015)

The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Satellite captured a 3-D image of a winter storm on February 17, 2015, that left six to 12 inches of snow over much of Kentucky, southwestern West Virginia, and northwestern North Carolina. The shades of blue in the 3-D image indicate rates of snowfall with more intense snowfall shown in darker blue. Underneath where it melts into rain, the most intense rainfall is shown in red. You can see a lot of variation in precipitation types over the southeastern portion of the United States.

The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments that show the...

Global Precipitiation Measurement Core Satellite Instruments

This visualization shows the scanning capabilities of the two instruments onboard the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core satellite--a state-of-the-art radiometer called the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the first space-borne Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR), which sees the 3D structure of falling rain and snow.

The GPM mission is co-led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA).  The GPM Core satellite to serves as a reference for precipitation measurements made by a constellation of satellites.  The DPR and GMI work in concert to provide a unique database...

Inside Cyclone Winston (February 20, 2016)

This visualization shows heavy rainfall throughout Northern Texas and across Oklahoma as well as the drought in Southern California from January 1, 2015 through July 16, 2015.

NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission launched on Feb. 27, 2014. It is a collaboration between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency and acts as the standard to unify precipitation measurements from a network of 12 satellites. IMERG combines data from all 12 satellites into a single, seamless map. The map covers more of the globe than any previous precipitation data set, allowing scientists to...