Videos

Why Do Raindrop Sizes Matter In Storms?

Not all raindrops are created equal. The size of falling raindrops depends on several factors, including where the cloud producing the drops is located on the globe and where the drops originate in the cloud. For the first time, scientists have three-dimensional snapshots of raindrops and snowflakes around the world from space, thanks to the joint NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. With the new global data on raindrop and snowflake sizes this mission provides, scientists can improve rainfall estimates from satellite data and in numerical...

Tracking California Rains During El Niño

This winter, areas across the globe experienced a shift in rain patterns due to the natural weather phenomenon known as El Niño. New NASA visualizations of rainfall data show the various changes to California.

According to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, El Niño was expected to produce wetter-than-average conditions from December 2015 to February 2016. Scientists refer to historical weather patterns and to look at trends of where precipitation normally occurs during El Niño events. Also, several factors—not just El Niño—can contribute to unusual weather pattern.

Related...

NASA | GPM Analyzes Powerful Tropical Cyclone Winston over Fiji

The Global Precipitation Measurement or GPM mission core satellite passed directly over Tropical Cyclone Winston on Feb. 20  just after it made landfall on the north coast of Viti Levu Island, which is the largest and most populated island in the nation of Fiji.

At the time, Winston was one of the most intense tropical cyclones observed in the South Pacific Ocean, and took an unusual track on the way to Fiji, completing a large counter-clockwise loop during the preceding week.

The GPM satellite, co-managed by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, is designed to measure rainfall...

NASA | OLYMPEX Successfully Grabs the Rains

NASA finishes campaign to study extreme rain, snow and winds of the Olympic National Forest. Scientists Walt Petersen of NASA Marshall and Robert Houze of the University of Washington narrate this inside look at the Olympic Mountain Experiment (OLYMPEX) field campaign. During the campaign, NASA and its partners gathered precipitation data through both ground and airborne instruments around the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State. They measured the abundance and variety of precipitation including light rain, heavy thunderstorms, and snowfall in the coastal forest.  The data collected will...

NASA | GPM: One Year of Storms

 

A look back at the snowstorms, tropical storms, typhoons, hurricanes and floods captured and analyzed by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission from around the globe during 2015. 

The complete list of storms by date and location are as follows:

1. New England Nor’easter – January 26 – New England, USA
2. Snowstorm – February 17 – Kentucky, Virginia and North Carolina, USA
3. Tornadic Thunderstorms in Midwest – March 25 – Oklahoma and Arkansas, USA
4. Typhoon Maysak – March 30 – Yap Islands, Southwest Pacific Ocean
5. Rain Accumulation from Cyclone Quang – April 28...

NASA | OLYMPEX Scientists in the Field: Joe Zagrodnik

 

Joe Zagrodnik is a student at the University of Washington who is working with NASA scientists to measure the properties of rain and snow in the Olympic National Park.

From November 10 through December 21, NASA and university scientists are taking to the field to study wet winter weather near Seattle, Washington. With weather radars, weather balloons, specialized ground instruments, and NASA's DC-8 flying laboratory, the science team will be verifying rain and snowfall observations made by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite mission on a NASA-led field campaign, The...

NASA | OLYMPEX Scientists in the Field: Rachael Kroodsma

 

Rachael Kroodsma is the instrument scientist for the CoSMIR on board NASA's DC-8 airborne laboratory as part of the OLYMPEX field campaign. 

From November 10 through December 21, NASA and university scientists are taking to the field to study wet winter weather near Seattle, Washington. With weather radars, weather balloons, specialized ground instruments, and NASA's DC-8 flying laboratory, the science team will be verifying rain and snowfall observations made by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) satellite mission on a NASA-led field campaign, The Olympic Mountain Experiment, or...

NASA | Researchers Gear Up for OLYMPEX

The Olympic Mountain Experiment, or OLYMPEX, is a NASA-led field campaign, which will take place on the Olympic Peninsula of Washington State from November 2015 through February 2016. The goal of the campaign is to collect detailed atmospheric measurements that will be used to evaluate how well rain-observing satellites measure rainfall and snowfall from space. In particular, OLYMPEX will be assessing satellite measurements made by the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Core Observatory, a joint mission by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), which launched in...

NASA | Seeing Inside A Hurricane

NASA scientist Dalia Kirschbaum explains how the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission's Core observatory has an instrument that can see layer by layer through a storm.

In this visualization of data by NASAs Goddard's Space Flight Center, we see Hurricane Joaquin when it was a tropical storm. Red and green colors show rain and the ice and snow at the top of the storm is visualized here in blue.

Understanding hurricane structure helps weather forecasters around the world determine a storm's structure and where it may be going.

Learn more: www.nasa.gov/gpm

NASA | Getting the Big Picture

A brief animated look at the different types of remote sensing techniques that NASA uses to study the Earth.

This video is public domain and can be downloaded at: http://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/goto?11877