JAXA

Pyrotechnics and Fueling for HII-A Rocket

On Tuesday, Feb. 25 (Japan time) at the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, pyrotechnics were connected on the H-IIA launch vehicle that will carry the NASA-JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory into space. In addition, the attitude control system that will control the second stage of the launch vehicle was fueled.

Live launch coverage from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., begins on NASA Television at 12noon EST on Thursday, Feb. 27. Watch online at:

http://www.nasa.gov/nasatv

Checks Performed on HII-A Rocket Electrical and Propulsion Systems

The NASA-JAXA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is on schedule to liftoff from Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan during a launch window that opens in just over 52 hours (Thursday, Feb. 27 at 1:07 p.m. EST).

Launch services provider Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) performed checks on the propulsion and electrical systems on the H-IIA rocket that will carry the GPM Core Observatory into space.

GPM Launch Rehearsal

GPM Launch Rehearsal
Image Caption: 
A good luck "Daruma Doll" is seen amongst the NASA GPM Mission launch team in the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2)

A good luck "Daruma Doll" is seen amongst the NASA GPM Mission launch team in the Spacecraft Test and Assembly Building 2 (STA2) during the all-day launch simulation for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), Tanegashima Island, Japan. One eye of the daruma doll is colored in when a goal is set, in this case a successful launch of GPM, and the second eye is colored in at the completion of the goal.

GPM Flags Welcome Visitors to Minamitame Town.

GPM Flags Welcome Visitors to Minamitame Town.
Image Caption: 
GPM Flags Welcome Visitors to Minamitame Town.

A roadside flag welcomes the NASA team and visitors to Minamitame Town, one of only a few small towns located outside of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC), where the launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory will take place in the next week, Saturday, Feb. 22, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan.

Entrance Sign to JAXA's Tanegashima Space Center

Entrance Sign to JAXA's Tanegashima Space Center
Image Caption: 
Entrance Sign to JAXA's Tanegashima Space Center

The entrance sign to the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) is seen a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours.

Sunset at Tanegashima Island

Sunset at Tanegashima Island
Image Caption: 
Sunset at Tanegashima Island

The sun sets just outside the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency’s (JAXA) Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. 

JAXA Topiary at Tanegashima Space Center

JAXA Topiary at Tanegashima Space Center
Image Caption: 
JAXA Topiary at Tanegashima Space Center

Topiary shaped into the logo of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is seen at the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) a week ahead of the planned launch of an H-IIA rocket carrying the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory, Friday, Feb. 21, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. The NASA-JAXA GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - JAXA