JAXA

H-IIA Guidance and Control System '"Go"

The Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observatory is continuing to move successfully toward launch.

Programs have been run on the guidance and control system on the H-IIA launch vehicle to confirm that all devices for flight attitude control are working as expected.

The one-hour launch window for the GPM Core Observatory opens at Feb. 27 at 1:37 p.m. EST (Feb. 28 at 3:37 a.m. JST).

Waiting for Launch

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The Global Precipitation Measurement mission's Core Observatory is poised for launch from the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Tanegashima Space Center, scheduled for the afternoon of Feb. 27, 2014 (EST).

GPM is a joint venture between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The GPM Core Observatory will link data from a constellation of current and planned satellites to produce next-generation global measurements of rainfall and snowfall from space.

Live from Japan: GPM Tweet Chat Recap

Live from Japan: GPM Tweet Chat Recap

Global Precipitation Measurement is a big mission. You've got questions? We've got answers.

Three days before launch of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan, NASA staff supporting the mission set up shop in the lobby of the Sun Pearl Hotel in nearby Minamitane for a live Twitter Q-and-A to answer questions about the mission and what it will do in orbit.

GPM's Launch Pad

GPM's Launch Pad
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GPM's Launch Pad

Launch pad 1 is seen at the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) on Monday, Feb. 24, 2014 in Tanegashima, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from pad 1 on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Surfing at Tanegashima Space Center

Surfing at Tanegashima Space Center
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Surfing at Tanegashima Space Center

A surfer navigates the waters in front of the Tanegashima Space Center (TNSC) launch pads on Sunday, Feb. 23, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014. Once launched, the GPM spacecraft will collect information that unifies data from an international network of existing and future satellites to map global rainfall and snowfall every three hours. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

GPM Launch Readiness Meeting

GPM Launch Readiness Meeting
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GPM Launch Readiness Meeting

Chief officers from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and NASA met on Wednesday, Feb. 26, 2014 in the Range Control Center (RCC) of the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, to review the readiness of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory for launch. The spacecraft is scheduled to launch aboard an H-IIA rocket early on the morning of Feb. 28 Japan time.

JAXA "Three Shrine Pilgrimage" Ceremony

JAXA "Three Shrine Pilgrimage" Ceremony
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JAXA "Three Shrine Pilgrimage" Ceremony

Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) team members bow at the Ebisu Shrine, the first shrine in a traditional San-ja Mairi, or Three Shrine Pilgrimage, where the team prays for a successful launch, Tuesday, Feb. 25, 2014, Tanegashima Island, Japan. A Japanese H-IIA rocket carrying the NASA-JAXA, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory is planned for launch from the space center on Feb. 28, 2014.

GPM Technical Briefing

GPM Technical Briefing
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GPM Technical Briefing

Seated from left: Tatsuo Namikawa, Director, Mitsubishi Launch Site Service Team (MILSET), Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Masahiro Kojima, GPM Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar project manager, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Art Azarbarzin, NASA Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) project manager, Steven Neeck, NASA Deputy Associate Director, Flight Programs, Earth Science Division, and, Hiroyuki Nagata, Director Range Technology Development Office Space Transportation Mission Directorate, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) are seen during a technical briefing for

GPM's Last Stop Before Orbit

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Art Azarbarzin, NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement mission project manager, and Mashahiro Kojima, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's GPM/DPR project manager, reflect on the long journey the GPM Core Observatory spacecraft has taken to reach its last stop before orbit, the Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, from where the mission's Core Observatory is scheduled to launch on the afternoon of Feb. 27, 2014 (EST).

GPM Confirmed for Launch

The GPM Core Observatory has received a green light for launch! 

On the morning of Feb. 26 (Japan time) at Tanegashima Space Center, chief officers from Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and NASA reviewed the readiness of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory for launch on an H-IIA rocket on Feb. 28 (Japan time). All launch vehicle and launch facility actions relevant to the GPM launch were reported complete. The review panel gave the approval to proceed with launch.

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