precipitation

The Evolution of NASA Precipitation Data
NASA’s global precipitation data and data processing systems have come a long way from the launch of TRMM in 1997 to the ongoing GPM mission. Just before midnight Eastern Daylight Time on June 15, 2015, a fireball appeared over central Africa, streaked across Madagascar, and tracked across the uninhabited Southern Indian Ocean. This was the fiery end of the joint NASA/Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). TRMM’s homecoming after more than 17 years in orbit also marked the end of the first major satellite mission specifically designed to gather...
gpm-signs-of-spring-photo-contest
div.section ul ul{ margin-left:2em; } Spring is in the air, and with it lots of precipitation. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM), launched in February 2014, measures Earth’s precipitation from above using a constellation of satellites. GPM can tell us where and how much it is raining and snowing so we can learn more about Earth’s water cycle, better model our weather and climate, and predict floods, droughts, hurricanes, and more. As GPM watches spring weather from above, we want to see what spring looks like to you! Get out your cameras and show us the signs of spring in your...
Goodbye to TRMM, First Rain Radar in Space
After 17 years of groundbreaking 3-D images of rain and storms, the joint NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) will come to an end next year. NASA predicts that science operations will cease in or about April 2015, based on the most recent analysis by mission operations at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland. Artist concept of TRMM in space over the eye of a tropical cyclone. Image Credit: NASA On July 8, 2014, pressure readings from the fuel tank indicated that TRMM was near the end of its fuel supply. As a result, NASA...
Document Description

The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission is an international space network of satellites designed to provide the next generation precipitation observations around the world every 2 to 4 hours. It is a science mission with integrated applications goals.

The Anatomy of a Raindrop

Submitted by JacobAdmin on Wed, 12/04/2013
Video Embed

When asked to picture the shape of raindrops, many of us will imagine water looking like tears that fall from our eyes, or the stretched out drip from a leaky faucet. This popular misconception is often reinforced in weather imagery associated with predictions and forecasts.

Raindrops are actually shaped like the top of a hamburger bun, round on the top and flat on the bottom. This new video from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission explains why.

Read the full article.

PMM Article Image
When asked to picture the shape of raindrops, many of us will imagine water looking like tears that fall from our eyes, or the stretched out drip from a leaky faucet. This popular misconception is often reinforced in weather imagery associated with predictions and forecasts. Raindrops are actually shaped like the top of a hamburger bun, round on the top and flat on the bottom. A new video from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission explains why. This short video explains how a raindrop falls through the atmosphere and why a more accurate look at raindrops can improve estimates of global...
Thumbnail for "For GOod Measure"
This page will automatically redirect you to the video "For Good Measure" on the Precipitation Education section of this site. If you are not redirected, click here window.location="/education/videos/for-good-measure";