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The NPOL radar and a Summer Tanger
By Ellen Gray, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Original www.nasa.gov Press Release (published 6/7/12) NASA and Nature Conservancy Agreement Supports [no-glossary]Precipitation[/no-glossary] and Migratory Bird Research The NASA NPOL radar is a research grade S-band, scanning dual-polarimetric radar. It underwent a complete antenna system upgrade in 2010 and is one of two fully transportable research-grade S-band systems in the world. It is used to make accurate volumetric measurements of precipitation including rainfall rate, particle size distributions, water contents and precipitation type...

Successful Electrical Integration of GPM’s Two Instruments

The electrical integration of the Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument onto the GPM Core Observatory was successfully completed in April 2012. Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp. Boulder, Colo. built the GMI, which arrived at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. in early March and after post shipment processing it was handed over to NASA. The GMI is one of the key instruments for the GPM Core Observatory. This instrument is a passive radiometer with 13 channels covering frequencies from 10 to 183 GHz. In May, 2012, the Dual-frequency

Another Tropical Cyclone Developing

While Tropical storm Aletta is forecast to weaken and dissipate another tropical cyclone appears to be forming in the eastern Pacific south of Acapulco, Mexico. The TRMM satellite passed above this tropical disturbance (92E) on 18 May 2012 at 0957 UTC. Data captured with this pass by TRMM's Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR) instruments were used in the rainfall analysis shown. This analysis indicates that this area contained very heavy rainfall in the northeastern quadrant of the disturbance. Some storms were producing rainfall at a rate of over 50 mm/hr (~2 inches). A 3-D

JAXA Launches GCOM-W1 Satellite

Congratulations to our partner, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), for the successful launch yesterday of the Global Change Observation Mission 1st - Water (GCOM-W1). GCOM-W1 carries the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) which successfully deployed its antenna on orbit. AMSR2 will detect microwave radiation to measure sea surface temperature, sea surface wind speed, sea ice concentration, snow depth, soil moisture, water vapor, cloud liquid water, and precipitation. GCOM-W1 will be a part of the GPM constellation, contributing its measurements to the GPM global data

Handover of Japan-built Radar to NASA

By Ellen Gray, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Original www.nasa.gov Press Release (published 4/3/12) On March 30, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) officially handed off a new satellite instrument to NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md. The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) was designed and built by JAXA and Japan's National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NTSpace). JAXA DPR Project Manager Masahiro Kojima (seated left) formally signed over the DPR to GPM Project Manager Art Azarbarzin (seated right). Behind from left to right: Minoru

GPM Microwave Imager Instrument Arrives at Goddard

By Rob Gutro, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Original www.nasa.gov Press Release (published 3/1/12) The Global Precipitation Measurement Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument has arrived at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. for integration into NASA's upcoming Earth science spacecraft. The instrument was built at the Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corp., Boulder, Colo. The GPM Microwave Imager instrument being placed in the acoustic chamber at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center on March 1, 2012. Credit: NASA / Ball Aerospace Engineers at NASA Goddard will integrate both the

GPM Instruments Undergo Pre-Ship Review

GMI Pre-Ship Review On January 30th and 31st, 2012, the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) underwent its Pre-Shipment Review at Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colorado. The GMI has successfully completed acoustic testing, vibration testing, and electromagnetic and thermal vacuum testing at the Ball facility. The instrument will be delivered to Goddard Space Flight Center on February 29th and will be integrated onto the GPM Core Observatory satellite over the coming year. This multi-channel, conical-scanning, microwave radiometer will provide an integrated view of precipitation over 13 different microwave

Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Ships from Japan to U.S.

By Aries Keck, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Original www.nasa.gov Press Release (published 2/8/12) GREENBELT, Md. – Japanese scientists and engineers have completed construction on a new instrument designed to take 3-D measurements of the shapes, sizes and other physical characteristics of both raindrops and snowflakes. The instrument will be shipped from Japan to NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md., to be integrated into an upcoming NASA Earth science satellite. Designed and built by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and Japan's National Institute of Information

GPM's Snow Ground Validation Underway

The GPM Cold-season Precipitation Experiment (GCPEx) to measure falling snow is currently underway in Ontario, Canada. The field campaign, which runs from January 17 to February 29, 2012, is designed to improve satellite estimates of falling snow and test ground validation capabilities for GPM. Learn more about GCPEx: Airborne Campaign to Measure Falling Snow (press release) GCPEx Overview GCPEx Campaign Blog Ground Validation Image Gallery GPM on Twitter GPM on Facebook
Document Description

A prototype Validation Network (VN) is currently operating as part of the Ground Validation System for NASA’s Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission. The VN supports precipitation retrieval algorithm development in the GPM prelaunch era. Postlaunch, the VN will be used to validate GPM spacecraft instrument measurements and retrieved precipitation data products.