GPM

Content which is affiliated solely with the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission.

Short-lived Bertha Brings Heavy Rains to Parts of Florida

Bertha was a named storm for just the briefest of periods, becoming a tropical storm on the morning of Wednesday May 27th at 8:30 am EDT just one hour before it made landfall along the South Carolina coast near Charleston. After making landfall, Bertha quickly weakened into a tropical depression and was then accelerated northward by the southerly flow between a deep trough of low pressure over the Mississippi Valley to the west and a ridge of high pressure located just off the US East Coast. Because of this, rainfall totals over the Carolina’s were not very heavy. Bertha’s biggest impact actually occurred when it was still in the formation process, before it became organized enough to be named. On Monday May 25th, a trough of low pressure became established over the Florida Straits, initiating shower and thunderstorm activity in the region. Over the next day, as this trough, which extended eastward over the warm waters of the Gulf Stream and eventually led to Bertha, slowly moved northward up the Florida peninsula, it provided a focus for showers and thunderstorms, which brought heavy rains to southeast Florida.

Cristobal Drenches Central America

The 2020 Atlantic hurricane season is off to a busy start. By the first week of June, Tropical Storm Arthur had already brushed North Carolina, Tropical Storm Bertha had drenched South Carolina, and the third named storm of the year— Cristobal—was dropping torrential rain on the Yucatán Peninsula. The storm first developed in the Pacific in late May as Tropical Storm Amanda, spinning off the southern end of a seasonal low-pressure pattern called the Central American Gyre. After making landfall in Guatemala and causing deadly floods in El Salvador, Amanda weakened and became less organized as

GPM IMERG Measures Rainfall from Tropical Storm Cristobal

This animation shows NASA IMERG rain rates (blue shading) and accumulations (green shading) alongside the NOAA low-pressure center track (red line) of Tropical Storm Amanda/Cristobal. The origin of this storm was in the eastern Pacific Ocean in late May 2020, where it was named Tropical Storm Amanda as it approached the southern Mexican and Central American coast. Amanda made landfall in Guatemala on May 31, where it began to deliver the first of a series of heavy rain pulses that led to flooding in the region. After temporarily stalling over land, the system reformed over the Bay of Campeche on June 1 as Tropical Storm Cristobal and made its second landfall on June 3 in Mexico. The storm continued to deliver several pulses of heavy rainfall to southern Mexico, Guatemala, and El Salvador. Some areas of the region accumulated over 60 cm (~2 feet) of rainfall throughout Cristobal's passage. The storm then crossed the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall in Louisiana on June 7 and progressed northward as a tropical depression before being classified as an extratropical low pressure system over Wisconsin on June 10. Large swaths of the U.S. Gulf Coast and Midwest as far north as Wisconsin saw accumulations in excess of 10 cm (~4 inches), and some areas along the coasts of Florida, Alabama, and Mississippi received over 20 cm (~8 inches), during Cristobal’s passage.

Update of PPS FTP service removal at GPM NRT

Effective 1 June 2020, ftp will no longer be available on the NRT server jsimpson.pps.eosdis.nasa.gov Effective that date the primary access method will be ftps. A number of different ways to use ftps are available: 1. Python 3 ftplib supports ftps 2. In Linux lftp is a ftps client 3. curl works with ftps 4. wget works with ftps 5. Packages are available for Windows You will need to have your system administrators open ports 64000-65000 in order for you ftps connection to jsimpsonftps.pps.eosdis.nasa.gov to work. If your attempt fails (hangs), it is likely that these ports are not available

PPS Announces Conversion of 3B42 / 3B43 (TMPA) products to HDF5

PPS is converting all of the V7 TMPA 3B42 and 3B43 data products to the HDF5 format. These products will be available from the PPS archive after the products are produced and archived at: ftp://arthourhou.pps.eosdis.nasa.gov The data will be located under the 'trmmdata' directory along side of the current HDF4 products and also through STORM (PPS's Online Data Ordering Interface): https://storm.pps.eosdis.nasa.gov Please note that the file name will match the HDF4 file name with the exception of the file extension which will be HDF5. Also, as HDF5 uses internal compression, there will be no

GPM Ka Outage - Current Unavailability of Ka and DPR Data Products

At 07:56:59GMT (3:56:59AM EDT) on April 22, 2020 both units on the Dual Precipitation Radar reset from Observation Mode to Standby Mode. The recovery process is ongoing for the Ka radar and we expect production of all radar products to resume normal operations soon. GMI operations and data products continue to be nominal during this time. PPS Production: PPS has put all radar and downstream product distribution on hold. Once products are released users should expect to see some partial and/or fully empty radar products. PPS will provide a complete listing of the anomaly orbits once we have all

DPR Ka Radar Data Acquisition has been Restored

Following a reset of the DPR to Standby Mode that occurred on April 22, 2020, the DPR Ka radar data acquisition has been restored. PPS is releasing the DPR and downstream data for distribution from April 22, 2020 - April 30, 2020. There are continuing short data outages for the radar that are being investigated and corrective measures are scheduled to be applied on May 14, 2020. PPS will be releasing May 2020 data in stages with an expected return to normal data availability soon after the corrective measures are applied. For Level-1 and Level-2 products, users should check the dataQuality

IMERG User Survey

The IMERG Algorithm Development Team is currently developing the next version of IMERG, V07. To help us prioritize our efforts, we have created a survey for users to identify aspects of IMERG that they consider important. Your responses will help us decide how we should focus our development effort for V07 and beyond. We deeply appreciate your responses. The survey is located at https://forms.gle/hgSMBXx7a2ScWpRSA This survey should take no more than 5 to 10 minutes. It is open through Monday, June 15.

Effective 18 June 2020 the end of GPM NRT FTP availability

At 11:00 UTC on 18 June 2020, FTP access to jsimpson will no longer be possible. The stoppage was originally scheduled for 1 June 2020 but due to the impacts of the CoVid19 pandemic, the end of FTP was delayed. Effective 11:00 UTC 18 June 2020, both jsimpson.pps.eosdis.nasa.gov and jsimpsonftps.eosdis.nasa.gov will provide FTPS access to GPM NRT data. FTPS will be the main, 24hr/7day retrieval protocol for getting GPM NRT data from PPS. Remember PPS implements explicit FTPS, FTPS retrieval will require your system administrators to open ports 64000-65000. You can find examples of using curl and wget for FTPS access to data on jsimpson in /NRTPUB/documentation/FTP-FTPS-Transition.pdf