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GMI in Electromagnetic Interference Testing
The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Microwave Imager (GMI) instrument is a multi-channel, conical- scanning, microwave radiometer serving an essential role in the near-global-coverage and frequent-revisit-time requirements of GPM. The instrumentation enables the Core spacecraft to serve as both a precipitation standard and as a radiometric standard for the other GPM constellation members. The GMI is characterized by thirteen microwave channels ranging in frequency from 10 GHz to 183 GHz. In addition to carrying channels similar to those on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI), the GMI carries four high frequency, millimeter-wave, channels near 166 GHz and 183 GHz. With a 1.2 m diameter antenna, the GMI provides significantly improved spatial resolution over TMI.
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The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory satellite operates in low Earth orbit, carrying two instruments for measuring Earth's precipitation and serving as a calibration standard for other members of the GPM satellite constellation. The satellite was developed and tested in-house at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and launched from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan, on February 27th, 2014. The GPM Core Observatory orbits Earth at an inclination of 65 degrees, which enables it to cut across the orbits of other microwave radiometers and sample the latitudes where nearly all precipitation occurs. A non-sun-synchronous orbit that takes it around Earth roughly 16 times per day allows it to sample precipitation at different times of the day. Data is transmitted continuously to ground systems on Earth by the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite (TDRS) communications network.
IMERG Early Run Example January 24th, 2020
IMERG Early Run Example January 24th, 2020
The Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) algorithm combines information from the GPM satellite constellation to estimate precipitation over the majority of the Earth's surface. This algorithm is particularly valuable over the majority of the Earth's surface that lacks precipitation-measuring instruments on the ground. Now in the latest Version 6 release of IMERG the algorithm fuses the early precipitation estimates collected during the operation of the TRMM satellite (2000 - 2015) with more recent precipitation estimates collected during operation of the GPM satellite (2014 - present). The longer the record, the more valuable it is, as researchers and application developers will attest. By being able to compare and contrast past and present data, researchers are better informed to make climate and weather models more accurate, better understand normal and extreme rain and snowfall around the world, and strengthen applications for current and future disasters, disease, resource management, energy production and food security.
IMERG Early Run Example January 24th, 2020
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Photograph of a landslide on a mountain.
Landslides are one of the most pervasive hazards in the world, resulting in more fatalities and economic damage than is generally recognized. Every year they block roads, damage infrastructure, and cause thousands of fatalities. Intense and prolonged rainfall is the most frequent landslide trigger around the world, but earthquakes and human influence can also cause significant and widespread landsliding. Using satellite data, we can identify the conditions under which landslides typically occur, helping to improve monitoring and modeling of these hazards
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3D Printed GPM Data  from Typhoon Malakas
Overview Precipitation data from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM) was used to generate these 3D printed models of various tropical cyclones and storm systems from the past several years. This data was collected by GPM's Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar instrument, which utilizes Ka-band and Ku-band frequencies to measure the size, shape, and distribution of liquid and solid water particles within clouds in three dimensions. The raw radar data was then processed by algorithms at NASA's Precipitation Processing System to be converted to precipitation rates, then was further