TRMM

PPS is Reprocessing TRMM PR Data as TRMM GPM, Version 06A HDF5 products in Early July 2018

The TRMM Version 7 Precipitation Radar (PR) products will be superseded by new GPM era products with a reprocessing that will generate TRMM retrievals from the beginning of the TRMM mission to the end of data collection using a single frequency retrieval algorithm similar to that used for GPM Ku. This reprocessing will begin in early July, 2018.

PPS Announces TRMM TMI L2-L3 GPROF V05A Reprocessed Data -Available Thursday April 19, 2018

PPS will start to process the TRMM TMI level 2 and level 3 GPROF products, the core member of the TRMM era GPROF products family, on Thursday, April 19, 2018. Similar to the early released TRMM era AMSRE, AMSUB, SSMI, MHS, SSMIS, AMSR2 and ATMS level 2 and level 3 products, all level 2 and level 3 GPROF products will be produced as GPM version V05, all products are in HDF5 format, all product names will use the GPM naming convention and the produced data will appear both in STORM:
https://storm.pps.eosdis.nasa.gov/storm/

TRMM Level 2-Level 3 GPROF Processing Announcement

With the completion of the TRMM era GPM constellation version 8 level 1 processing, PPS will start to process the TRMM era MHS, SSMIS, AMSR2 and ATMS version 8 level 2 and level 3 GPROF products on Monday October 16, 2017.  Similar to the TRMM version 8 level 1 constellation products, all level 2 and level 3 GPROF products will be produced as GPM version V05, all products are in HDF5 format, all product names will use the GPM file naming convention:

3B4x-RT Failure and Backfilling

With the turnover of the year to 2016, the suite of 3B40RT, 3B41RT, and 3B42RT failed to process.  Despite the holiday weekend, this was traced to a very old quality control on the date/time, fixed, and retrospectively processed to give a complete time series. Thanks to Erich Stocker and David Bolvin for this effort.

The affected date/times are 160101 00UTC through 160102 12UTC.

TRMM Spacecraft Re-enters Over Tropics

The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere on June 15, 2015, at 11:55 p.m. EDT, over the South Indian Ocean, according to the U.S. Strategic Command’s Joint Functional Component Command for Space through the Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC). The U.S. Space Surveillance Network, operated by the Defense Department's JSpOC, had been closely monitoring TRMM’s descent since the mission was ended in April. Most of the spacecraft was expected to burn up in the atmosphere during its uncontrolled re-entry.

How Raindrops Could Save Rupees

Using NASA Data to Show How Raindrops Could Save Rupees

Rainwater could save people in India a bucket of money, according to a new study by scientists looking at NASA satellite data.

The study, partially funded by NASA’s Precipitation Measurement Missions, found that collecting rainwater for vegetable irrigation could reduce water bills, increase caloric intake and even provide a second source of income for people in India.

TRMM Spacecraft Re-enters Over Tropics

TRMM Spacecraft Debris to Re-Enter

June 16, 2015, Update: The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere on June 15, 2015, at 11:55 p.m. EDT, over the South Indian Ocean, according to the U.S. Strategic Command’s Joint Functional Component Command for Space through the Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC). The U.S. Space Surveillance Network, operated by the Defense Department's JSpOC, had been closely monitoring TRMM’s descent since the mission was ended in April.

TRMM Mission Comes to an End

Video Embed: 

In 1997 when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, or TRMM, was launched, its mission was scheduled to last just a few years. Now, 17 years later, the TRMM mission has come to an end. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) stopped TRMM’s science operations and data collection on April 8 after the spacecraft depleted its fuel reserves.

Learn More

TRMM Comes to an End after 17 Years

The website encountered an unexpected error. Please try again later.

In 1997 when the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission, or TRMM, was launched, its mission was scheduled to last just a few years. Now, 17 years later, the TRMM mission has come to an end. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) stopped TRMM’s science operations and data collection on April 8 after the spacecraft depleted its fuel reserves.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - TRMM