TRMM

TRMM Spacecraft Re-Entry

June 16, 2015, Update: The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft re-entered the Earth’s atmosphere on June 15, 2015, at 11:55 p.m. EDT, over the South Indian Ocean, according to the U.S. Strategic Command’s Joint Functional Component Command for Space through the Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC). The U.S. Space Surveillance Network, operated by the Defense Department's JSpOC, had been closely monitoring TRMM’s descent since the mission was ended in April. Most of the spacecraft was expected to burn up in the atmosphere during its uncontrolled re-entry.

TRMM PR Data Distribution Resumes

TRMM/PR data distribution resumes during the experimental operation period. The satellite has descended to an altitude of around 350 km on February 12, 2015, which is the original nominal altitude before 2001. Verification of the data quality concluded and JAXA and PPS started distribution of PR data around the 350 km altitude (orbit number from 98231) to the public. PR available data period around 350 km altitude will be about 40 days since February 12, 2015.

Two Satellites Measured Rainfall in Tropical Depression Mekkhala

News Image: 
Two Satellites Measured Rainfall in Tropical Depression Mekkhala

The first tropical depression of the 2015 western Pacific season formed southwest of Guam on January 13 and is predicted to intensify into a tropical storm while headed toward the Philippines. NASA's TRMM and GPM satellites provided a look at Tropical Depression Mekkhala's rainfall data that showed the area of moderate rainfall had expanded as the storm strengthened on January 13.
Mekkhala was previously known as Tropical Depression 01W until January 14 when it was renamed.

TRMM Precipitation Radar Data Suspended

The TRMM satellite is descending, and the users of TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) data should be aware that the last production orbit of public PR data was orbit #96230 from October 7th, 2014. From that point forward, the TRMM PR data is suspended because no useful cloud data are being observed. It is possible that PR data will again be made available when TRMM descends to the vicinity of its at-launch altitude of 350 km.

The Transition in Multi-Satellite Products from TRMM to GPM (TMPA to IMERG)

Published Date: 
08/27/2018

The transition from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data products to the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission products is well underway. This document specifically addresses the multi-satellite products, the TRMM Multi-satellite Precipitation Analysis (TMPA), the real-time TMPA (TMPA-RT), and the Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG).

Mission Affiliation: 
Major Category: 
Author(s): 

Data Sources

This section outlines the primary sources for downloading GPM and TRMM precipitation data from archive sites at Goddard Space Flight Center, including basic instructions for using each source.

NOTE: Use of the PPS FTP and STORM requires you to first register your email address. Click here to register.

TRMM Out Of Fuel, Continues to Provide Data

TRMM Out Of Fuel, Continues to Provide Data

Pressure readings from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) fuel tank on July 8 indicated that the satellite was nearly at the end of its fuel supply. As a result, NASA has ceased maneuvers to keep the satellite at its operating altitude of 402 kilometers (~250 miles). With its speed decreasing, TRMM has begun to drift downward. A small amount of fuel remains to conduct debris avoidance maneuvers to ensure the satellite remains safe.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - TRMM