Missions

GPM 10-in-10 Banner showing the GPM satellite over Earth sensing precipitation.
Have you ever wondered how Earth observing satellites are able to measure things like precipitation, temperature, and other phenomenon from space? Join us during this free webinar to learn about “remote sensing” and gain an understanding of how and why we use satellites to help us understand and protect our home planet.
GPM 10-year banner
Too little or too much precipitation can mean the difference between life and death. Join us as we learn about the impacts of having too much or too little precipitation and the disasters that can occur as a result. Discover what we are learning about the connection between extreme weather events and climate change. Find out the many ways that NASA is helping us monitor and respond to natural hazards and disasters.
GPM 10-in-10 Climate Banner
May 9, 2024, 8:00 p.m. ET Overview In this webinar we will explore Earth’s weather and climate through the lens of NASA. Learn the difference between weather and climate, why it’s challenging to accurately predict the weather, and explore different weather and climate models. Also, learn how NASA’s “Earth to Sky” program is engaging with interpreters across the U.S. to collaborate and share this and other information with the public. Resources Resource Packet Speakers Dr. Marshall Shepherd Dr. J. Marshall Shepherd is a leading international weather-climate expert and is the Georgia Athletic
GPM 10-in-10 Earth's water banner
March 14, 2024, 8 p.m. ET Overview On March 22 we celebrate World Water Day! For the next in our GPM 10-in-10 webinar series, join NASA scientists to learn all about freshwater, Earth’s most precious resource. Find out how and why NASA keeps track of Earth's limited freshwater resources and discover how you can monitor precipitation yourself as a citizen scientist working with CoCoRaHS and the GLOBE Program . Guest speakers include John Bolten, Chris Kidd, Noah Newman, Marilé Colón Robles, and Dorian Janney. Resources Webinar 2 Recording Resource Packet About the Speakers John Bolten John is
GPM 10 Year Banner
Celebrate the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission's 10th Anniversary! The NASA / JAXA GPM Core Observatory satellite launched on Feb. 27, 2014 from Tanagashima Space Center in Japan, marking the start of the Global Precipitation Measurement mission . We will celebrate this ten-year anniversary throughout 2024 with special events and opportunities. We invite all of you to join us as we share how this international constellation has improved life around the globe. About GPM The GPM Mission & Core Observatory Satellite GPM Applications & Societal Benefits IMERG - A Global Map of Earth's Rain
Text that says "GPM 10-in-10 Webinar Series" with a background showing a silver satelliet with large blue solar panels in space over a large hurricane on Earth's surface.
February 8, 2024, 8 p.m. ET Overview In the first webinar of our series we will introduce you to the GPM mission and some of the key GPM team members who have been critical to its success. Our current Project Scientist George Huffman will provide an overview of the missions’ science objectives and discuss a few of GPM’s achievements over the past 10 years. Candace Carlisle, who served as GPM’s Deputy Project Manager through launch and check-out, will talk about the engineering behind the GPM mission and share a few of her experiences. Former GPM Project Scientist Scott Braun will explore GPM’s
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Updated: Nov. 8, 2023 George Huffman, GPM Project Scientist The GPM Core Observatory (GPM-CO) satellite performed two orbit boost maneuvers on Nov. 7 and 8 , 2023 that raised its altitude from 400km to 435km. The goal of these boosts is to restore the GPM-CO's lifespan closer to the original estimates of ending in the early 2030’s. Recent lifespan estimates have been getting shorter due to unexpectedly high solar activity, which causes additional atmospheric drag on the spacecraft. The primary goal of restoring GPM-CO’s lifespan is to allow the GPM mission to overlap with the satellites
GPM Core Observatory data of precipitation within Typhoon Mawar
Driven by powerful winds and intense rainfall, Typhoon Mawar emerged as a rapidly intensifying storm in the western Pacific Ocean. Originating from a tropical disturbance, the typhoon swiftly developed into a significant weather system, eventually making landfall on the U.S. territory of Guam on May 25, 2023, as a Category 4 typhoon. After hitting Guam, it further intensified into a Category 5 typhoon, making it one of the most powerful storms on record in the month of May. Download this video from the NASA Goddard Scientific Visualization Studio The combination of NASA’s IMERG precipitation
2022 PMM Science Team Meeting Group Photo
Above image: In-person attendees of the 2022 PMM Science Team Meeting. Below image: A selection of virtual attendees.