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IMERG Sees Heavy Rain Over United States

During the past week the combination of tropical storm Bill's landfall and a slowly moving frontal system extending from the Midwest to the Northeastern states dropped extreme rainfall from Texas' Gulf coast to the northeastern states. Data from NASA's Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) were used in this analysis to estimate the extreme amount of rain that fell during the past seven days. Tropical Storm Bill and it's remnants caused very heavy rainfall while moving through Texas and Oklahoma. Over a foot of rain was reported in Oklahoma resulting in at least two deaths. The

Weakening Tropical Storm Bill Seen By GPM

The GPM core observatory satellite had a good daytime look at tropical storm Bill on Wednesday June 17, 1015 at 1552 UTC ( 10:52 AM CDT). GPM saw that an area of heavy rain on Bills northern side was then moving into southern Oklahoma. The Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on board the satellite measured rain dropping at a rate of over 50 mm (almost 2 inches) per hour in some intense storms. GPM radar data (Ku band) were also used to look at the 3-D structure and storm top heights within storms associated with tropical storm Bill. This image shows that in some areas the dissipating

IMERG Sees Gulf Rainfall With Tropical Storm Bill

Tropical storm Bill became the second named tropical cyclone in the Atlantic Ocean Basin when it formed in the western Gulf Of Mexico on June 16, 2015. Data from the NASA's Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (IMERG) was used in this analysis to estimate rainfall from Tropical Storm Bill. Precipitation was analyzed from the time when tropical storm Bill was forming in the Gulf Of Mexico on Monday June 15, 2015 until early this morning at 0800 UTC (4 AM CDT). The storm was dropping heavy rainfall over Texas this morning but this analysis indicates that the heaviest rainfall totals, up

Tropical Storm Carlos Viewed By GPM

Tropical storm Carlos is the third tropical cyclone in what promises to be a busy 2015 eastern Pacific hurricane season. The GPM core observatory satellite flew directly above Carlos on June 12, 2015 at 0716 UTC. GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments showed that heavy rain was falling in a band of powerful storms to the southeast of the tropical storm's center of circulation. Rainfall was measured by GPM radar (Ku band) falling at a rate of almost 70 mm (2.8 inches) per hour in Carlos' most intense areas of rainfall. Those same radar data were

Tropical Cyclone Ashobaa Contains Powerful Storms

The GPM core observatory had another excellent view of tropical cyclone Ashobaa in the Arabian Sea over on June 8, 2015 at 2131 UTC. As expected, Ashobaa was more powerful than when seen by GPM earlier in the day. GPM's Microwave Imager (GMI) and Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) instruments showed that rain was falling at a rate of over 70.5 mm (about 2.8 inches) per hour in bands of storms west of the center of circulation. Very powerful storms were seen west of tropical cyclone Ashobaa's center of circulation by GPM's Ku Band Radar. A 3-D view constructed from GPM's Ku band radar